February 10th, 2014
10:54 AM ET

Kenneth Bae Worried About His Health in North Korean Camp

Kenneth Bae, a Korean-American being held in North Korea, says he is worried about his health after authorities moved him back into a labor camp following a stay in a hospital.

"I know if I continue for the next several months here, I will probably be sent back to the hospital again," Bae says in a video of a conversation with a Swedish diplomat recorded Friday.

Footage of the conversation in the labor camp was released by Choson Sinbo, a pro-North Korean newspaper based in Japan that has been given access to Bae in the past.

Wearing a gray jacket with the prisoner number "103" marked on it, Bae tells the Swedish diplomat, Cecilia Anderberg, that he thinks he's already lost as much as 10 pounds in weight since he was transferred back to the camp a few weeks ago.

He expresses hope that North Korea will allow a U.S. envoy to visit for talks about his case.

But those hopes appeared to have been dashed over the weekend.

A State Department official said Sunday that North Korea had rescinded its invitation to the envoy, Ambassador Robert King, without giving a reason.

Hours later, the North's state-run Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) reported that former U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Donald Gregg had arrived in Pyongyang.

The brief KCNA report Monday didn't state the purpose of the visit by Gregg, the chairman of the Pacific Century Institute, a U.S. nonprofit group that aims to promote education, dialogue and research in the Pacific region.

Bae, of Lynwood, Washington, was arrested in November 2012 in Rason, along North Korea's northeastern coast. Pyongyang sentenced him last year to 15 years of hard labor, accusing him of planning to bring down the government through religious activities.

He is widely reported to have been carrying out Christian missionary work in North Korea.

Bae, 45, operated a China-based company specializing in tours of North Korea, according to his family, who have described him as a devout Christian.

He was transferred to a hospital last year after his health deteriorated. But last week the United States said he had been moved back to a labor camp, a development his family described as "devastating."

In the video, Bae asks the Swedish diplomat to tell his family that "I have not lost hope and have not given up anything."

But says he is concerned that if his situation isn't resolved soon, it could "drag on" for months longer. He notes that annual U.S.-South Korean military drills due to start later this month may deepen tensions in the region, as they did last year.

State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki on Sunday expressed disappointment that Ambassador Robert King's visit was called off and noted North Korea had said it wouldn't use Bae as a "political bargaining trip." It is the second time North Korea has canceled a planned visit by King.

Psaki said that the joint military exercises are "in no way linked to Mr. Bae's case."

North Korea has been urging the South not to take part in the drills - a call that Seoul and Washington have rejected.

The Rev. Jesse Jackson, the U.S. civil rights leader, has offered, at the request of Bae's family, to "travel to Pyongyang on a humanitarian mission focused on Bae's release," Psaki said.

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