Five Things to Know for Your New Day – Friday, January 2, 2015
Former New York Gov. Mario Cuomo at the 1984 Democratic National Convention.
January 2nd, 2015
05:26 AM ET

Five Things to Know for Your New Day – Friday, January 2, 2015

The Democratic Party loses one of its icons. Bad weather slows AirAsia search. And the college football national championship is set.

It's Friday and here are the 5 things to know for your New Day

1. MARIO CUOMO

Party standard-bearer: The Democratic Party has lost one of its giants. Former New York Gov. Mario Cuomo died yesterday at the age of 82. He had been hospitalized recently to treat a heart condition, but passed away, at home, from "natural causes due to heart failure," his family said. Cuomo's passionate and powerful keynote address at the 1984 Democratic political convention vaulted him onto the national political scene. President Barack Obama praised Cuomo for his faith in God and championing of progressive values in a statement issued by the White House.

More on this story.

FULL POST

Five Things to Know for Your New Day – Thursday, December 25, 2014
Feliz Navidad, Joyeux Noël or Frohe Weihnachten. Anyway you say it, it's Merry Christmas
December 25th, 2014
03:32 AM ET

Five Things to Know for Your New Day – Thursday, December 25, 2014

Berkeley, Missouri, is no Ferguson. The trip to grandmother's house was filled with delays. And "The Interview" goes online.

It's Christmas Day and here are the 5 things to know for your New Day

1. MISSOURI SHOOTING

Looking at the facts: Don't confuse this week's fatal shooting of a black teen by a white cop in Berkeley, Missouri, with a similar shooting about a mile and a half down the road in Ferguson that sparked national protests. Berkeley Mayor Theodore Hoskins, who is black, says it's a different situation. The mayor and the police chief say 18-year-old Antonio Martin pointed a gun at an officer in a gas station parking lot in Berkeley right before the officer fatally shot the teen. In the Ferguson shooting, Michael Brown was unarmed. Hoskins has promised a thorough investigation and says he won't tolerate brutality.

More on this story.
FULL POST

Five Things to Know for Your New Day – Wednesday, December 24, 2014
Storm damage in Mississippi where tornadoes killed four people yesterday
December 24th, 2014
04:58 AM ET

Five Things to Know for Your New Day – Wednesday, December 24, 2014

Christmas Eve travel gets messy. No break in New York protests against police violence. And the first President Bush is in the hospital.

It's Wednesday and here are the 5 things to know for your New Day

1. WEATHER – HOLIDAY TRAVEL

Dangerous storms: This Christmas, people will grieve and heal in southern Mississippi. They will clear rubble and restore power lines in the wake of a tornado system that killed four people and packed an emergency room with dozens of injured. Yesterday's deadly whirlwinds were isolated to a swath near the Louisiana line, but across the country, rough weather is sweeping for hundreds of miles, while roads and airways fill with holiday travelers. The National Weather Service predicts "heavy rainfall and flooding, and heavy snow from the Gulf Coast to the Great Lakes through Wednesday." With a forecast like that, Christmas Day might be the better time to embark on a family trip in many parts of the country.

More on this story.

FULL POST

Five Things to Know for Your New Day – Tuesday, December 23, 2014
New York Mayor Mayor Bill de Blasio arrives to speak at the Police Athletic League Luncheon on Dec. 22
December 23rd, 2014
04:06 AM ET

Five Things to Know for Your New Day – Tuesday, December 23, 2014

New York's mayor tries to defuse tensions. North Korea has its Internet back. And rock and roll says goodbye to an iconic voice.

It's Tuesday and here are the 5 things to know for your New Day

1. NYPD COP KILLINGS

Turning blue: New York Mayor Bill de Blasio is catching plenty of heat in the aftermath of the execution-style killings of two of the city's cops over the weekend. Critics - including those in the police force - accuse him of stoking an anti-police fervor that contributed to the deaths of officers Wenjian Liu and Rafael Ramos. He came into office promising police reform. Now he's trying to cool tensions after encouraging people to protest the killings of Michael Brown and Eric Garner, two unarmed African-American men, at the hands of white police officers. Neither officer was charged. He said the murders this weekend were "an attack on all of us" and called for a hiatus from the protests.

More on this story.

FULL POST

« older posts