January 28th, 2014
11:18 AM ET

Rep. King: 'Minimum Wage Hike is Unconstitutional'

While President Barack Obama’s attempts to increase the nation’s minimum wage through legislation have stalled in Congress, the White House announced plans on Tuesday to use the president’s executive powers to partially address the problem.

Just hours before the President is scheduled to deliver his fifth State of the Union address, the White House revealed that Obama will issue an executive order to increase the minimum wage for new federal contract workers.

In response to this news, CNN's Chris Cuomo spoke with Iowa Republican Steve King.

King presented resistance to this new policy, claiming it was even unconstitutional.

"It provides incentive to step up and defend the Constitution," he said.

"This is the president who is a former adjunct professor of teaching constitutional law at the University of Chicago. He knows better, and he gave a speech to the high school here in Washington D.C. a couple years ago that made it clear to them that he knows better. He has limitations. He’s article 1. He’s the executive branch of government. His job is to keep his oath of office and take care that the laws be faithfully executed.  It's Congress's job to pass the laws.  He knows that and we need to take our oath seriously and defend the Constitution here in Congress."

SEE FULL INTERVIEW ABOVE

January 28th, 2014
09:55 AM ET

Obama to Raise Minimum Wage for Federal Contractors

While President Barack Obama’s attempts to increase the nation’s minimum wage through legislation have stalled in Congress, the White House announced plans on Tuesday to use the president’s executive powers to partially address the problem.

Just hours before the President is scheduled to deliver his fifth State of the Union address, the White House revealed that Obama will issue an executive order to increase the minimum wage for new federal contract workers.

The action will cover all workers employed under future government contracts, ensuring that none is paid less than $10.10 an hour. In a fact sheet announcing the action, the White House highlighted several occupations that will be helped by the move, including kitchen and laundry workers on military bases, as well as janitors at federal buildings and construction workers at government building sites.

“The President has embraced the idea in the past that he can use his authority as President and the powers available to the President to advance his agenda on behalf of the American people,” White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said at his briefing on Monday. “What we have said is that he views 2014 as a year of action and that he has tasked his team to come up with new ways in which we can – he can – advance that agenda.”

White House Senior Adviser Valerie Jarrett added on "New Day" Tuesday, "He doesn't want to sit waiting when there are too many contractors working for the federal government who are raising their children in poverty."

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An administration official confirmed the action will only apply to new contracts, and the White House believes contractors will have time to factor the new wage requirements into future bids.

Included in Tuesday’s announcement was a call for Congress to pass an increase in the minimum wage nationwide and an endorsement of a proposal put forward by two senior Democrats, Sen. Tom Harkin of Iowa and Rep. George Miller of California. The proposal would raise the minimum wage for all workers in stages, ultimately reaching $10.10 an hour, while also indexing the wage floor to inflation going forward.

Obama has made wages and economic inequality a central theme of his second term in office, raising the issue repeatedly, including during a call for an extension of emergency unemployment benefits in his first public event of 2014.

“America is getting stronger, and we've made progress,” the President said. “And the economy is growing, and we've got to do more to make sure that all Americans share in that growth. We've got to help our businesses create more jobs. We've got to make sure those jobs offer the wages and benefits that let families rebuild a little security. In other words, we've got to make sure that this recovery leaves nobody behind. And we've got a lot of work to do on that front.”